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Introduction of Javascript

Introduction of Javascript


Introduction of Javascript:

JavaScript is a client-side scripting language or browser scripting. Client side scripting language means that the browser will run / execute these scripts. Unlike the client side, the server side, the code of the server side languages ​​is executed / run through the web server.

JAVA and Javascript are completely different languages. JAVA is a full-fledged object-oriented programming language and Javascript is a scripting language. JavaScript and programming language but it only works in browsers where a completely different application can be created with JAVA that runs on PC.


Many aspects of Javascript, especially syntax, are borrowed from JAVA, but you don't need to know JAVA or any other language to learn JavaScript.


JavaScript is basically made up of 3 things

1. ECMAScript (this is the core functionality of JavaScript)

2. DOM (Document Object Model - works with web page content) and

3. BOM (Browser Object Model - works with the browser)



JavaScript can be used to create a variety of effects or interesting objects on an HTML page, as well as form validation and ajax work. Among the most well-known works

Home

Mouse Trailers (Animation created on the mouse while browsing the site)

Dropdown menu

Alert message

Popup window

Form validation

Slideshow

Moving news

Many more ...

You must know HTML well before you start JavaScript.


JavaScript is a high-level programming language. it absolutely was originally designed as a scripting language for websites however became wide adopted as a general-purpose artificial language, and is presently the foremost well-liked artificial language in use[1]. JavaScript is typically found running during a application as interactive or automatic content, starting from popup messages and live clocksto large web applications. JavaScript is additionally normally used in server-side programming through platforms like Node.js, or "embedded" in non-JavaScript applications wherever the bottom artificial language lacks the high-level practicality that JavaScript offers.

Despite the similarities in name only and syntax, JavaScript isn't associated with the programming language Java. although the names of each languages are trademarks of Oracle Corporation, the 2 languages follow completely different style principles, and area unit actively developed by unrelated organizations. JavaScript usually abbreviated as JS, is a programming language that conforms to the ECMAScriptspecification. It has curly-bracket syntax, dynamic writing, prototype-based object-orientation, and first-class functions. JavaScript (JS) may be a light-weight, taken, or just-in-time compiled artificial language with first-class functions. whereas it's most well-known because the scripting language for web content, several non-browser environments also use it, such as Node.js, Apache CouchDB and Adobe athlete.JavaScript is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm,  purposeful programming) designs. browse more about JavaScript.

This section is devoted to the JavaScript language itself, and not the elements that area unit specific to web content or different host environments. For data about APIsspecific to web content, please see Web APIsand DOM.

The standard for JavaScript is ECMAScript. As of 2012, all modern browsers fully support ECMAScript five.1. Older browsers support a minimum of ECMAScript three. On June 17, 2015, ECMA International published the sixth major version of ECMAScript, that is formally known as ECMAScript 2015, and was ab initio brought up as ECMAScript half dozen or ES6. Since then, ECMAScript standards area unit on yearly unleash cycles. This documentation refers to the newest draft version, that is currently ECMAScript 2020.

Do not confuse JavaScript with the Java artificial language. each "Java" and "JavaScript" area unit logos or registered logos of Oracle within the U.S. and different countries. However, the 2 programming languages have terribly completely different syntax, semantics, and uses
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